60 Minutes with Fotosynthesis

I met Ingrid Guyon when I helped out on a project for Fotosynthesis in early 2014.  they had this genius idea for teaching year 4 kids about measuring and maths that involved gettingthem to make pinhole cameras, to take photos and develop them.  Nothing beats seeing a kid watching a photograph coming up in the developer.  We stayed in touch and that summer I helped her out when she was taking portraits at the South Bank Centre.  I took polaroids of the process.

The aye’s have it

I was on my way somewhere yesterday and I saw this.  There is something more powerful about the crude the scratching out of the eyes of a human form in an image than most other forms of alteration. A photo posted by Tina Rowe (@tinarororo) on Mar 24, 2016 at 2:37am PDT Thinking about it, I reckon most forms of interference with the eyes turns things sinister with immediate effect. Sarah Koponen‘s image of George Bush, although powerful, lacks the creepiness that the other two images have.  This image appears to me to depersonalise the president, more a criticism of …

The Thin Black Line and the Broad White One.

I went to a talk between Lubaina Himid and Paul Goodwin at the Whitechapel Gallery last week.  They discussed three exhibitions she had worked with in the 1980s: Five Black Women at the Africa Centre (1983), Black Women Time Now at Battersea Arts Centre (1983-4) and The Thin Black Line at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (1985).  It was illuminating and more than a little  depressing.   One thing that got wedged in my head was how the exhibition at the ICA, deeply symbolic in a conduit between the big art stuff (ironically very small artworks by Richard Tuttle) and the …